Put a Stop to Sexual Assault

April 01, 2017

This April marks the 16th anniversary of Sexual Assault Awareness Month, which aims to increase public knowledge about sexual violence and educate communities on how to prevent it. For 2017, the theme of Engaging New Voices hopes to spread the word to as many people as possible in order to promote safety. 

Unfortunately, sexual assault is an issue that hits close to home for many who have either been a victim themselves or know of a loved one who has been affected. In the U.S., one in two women and one in five men have experienced sexual violence, and most victims are 25 years of age or younger. 

Just being aware of the facts goes a long way to help prevent sexual violence before it occurs, so here’s what you should know: 

  • Sexual assault can occur anywhere, from the workplace to the coffee shop, and includes any type of unwanted sexual contact, from sexist words (like jokes) to actions (like rape and murder). It is any language or action that is of a sexual nature against a person’s will. It is sexual activity where consent is not freely given.
  • Consequences can be short term and include guilt, shame and fear, as well as long term, with victims experiencing physical and mental issues ranging from post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) to eating disorders and depression.
  • If you witness or experience sexual violence, speak up and get help and support from trusted family and friends. Do not stay silent. Contact the police if you feel unsafe. 
  • Educate yourself about the issue so you can take action. Learn more by visiting the website for the National Sexual Violence Resource Center at www.nsvrc.org
     

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Let Us Be Your One Shot Stop

February 01, 2017

Imagine being able to tell your children they’ve got a superpower. It may not be as exciting as reading minds or flying, but if they get all their vaccinations according to schedule they’ll be immune to over 14 different diseases. Here at AltaMed we think that’s pretty heroic. 

Vaccines are the most successful and practical way to prevent diseases like the measles and whooping cough, and according to the Centers for Disease Control, the United States currently has the safest and most effective vaccine supply in its history. 

Getting your child vaccinated is important for their health and the health of your entire community in order to prevent possible outbreaks. Most vaccines need to be given before your child reaches 2 years of age, and your AltaMed provider is here to help you create an immunization plan. Children and adolescents also need vaccines between age 9 and 13. Your child’s wellness exams are a great time to check in and make sure you’re on track. 

Did You Know Vaccines…


…can save your child’s life?

…are safe and effective?

…protect others from spreading harmful diseases?

…save time and money by preventing missed school/work and possible medical/hospital bills if your child gets sick?

…are typically covered by health insurance plans or are available at no cost to low-income families?

…protect future generations by hopefully one day eliminating these diseases from our world?

 

For more information or to schedule an appointment with your provider call (888) 499-9303

 

 

Happy Holidays: Eat, Drink, and Stay Healthy

November 01, 2016

This is the great time of the year when friends and families get together to celebrate the holidays. The downside is that all these fun gatherings can turn into extra calories and less time to exercise – but that doesn’t mean skipping the festivities. 

Here are some tips on how to enjoy the season without letting a good health suffer.

 

 Going Easy On . . . 

 

  • Sugar: Apple cider and eggnog? These beverages often contain a ton of sugar –
    especially when alcohol is added. It’s okay to enjoy these in moderation, making sure to have a glass of water in between every drink.
  • Dairy: It’s not a party if there’s no dessert. But the key to maintaining healthy is  keeping the servings small and not going back for seconds. Skipping the whipped cream or ice cream, which often accompany the slice of pie, also helps.  
  • Red Meat: Opting for lean cuts or skipping it entirely, and sticking with fish or skinless chicken, are great options. So is eating twice as many vegetables as meat. Also, baking, grilling, or steaming food are healthier options than frying.  
  • Saturated Fat: Moderation is key. A quick example – for any dish – is cutting down on the butter. In general, using olive oil instead of butter adds some healthy unsaturated fats to the food. For flavor, fresh herbs and spices are good alternatives. For baking, Greek yogurt, banana, or equal parts unsweetened applesauce can substitute butter. 

Being realistic is also important. Here’s a morsel of advice to keep in mind:

  • Trying to maintain the current weight is better than worrying about shedding a few pounds over the holidays.  
  • A full calendar shouldn’t get in the way of exercise. Walking for 10-15 minutes, twice a day, helps maintaining good health through the season. 
  • Arriving at a party too hungry is a bad idea. So when going to a celebration, it’s important to make healthier choices the rest of the day. 
  • The key is eating to get satisfied – not stuffed. After eating, and giving it some time to settle, going back for seconds is okay. 
  • Bringing an appetizer, a main dish,  or dessert to the celebration can help keeping control of the situation. Healthier recipes for traditional favorites is just an Internet search away.